Raised garden planter images


Growing season is creeping nearer, or even here, and we all are looking at our garden beds from last year. And possibly being disappointed by their condition. Have you considered using raised garden beds this year? Raised beds are great for veggies and herbs, and can be the perfect solution for flower beds when the soil is poor. Or for when a gardener just needs an easier way to maintain their garden space. Easy to put together, DIY raised garden beds are nothing more than a box, with or without a bottom, filled with good garden soil.

Content:
  • These Lego-Like Bricks Make Building a Raised Garden Bed a Snap
  • Raised Garden Beds
  • Raised Beds vs. In-Ground Gardens
  • 28 Best DIY Raised Bed Garden Ideas & Designs
  • 30 Raised Garden Bed Ideas
  • 40 Unique Container Gardening Ideas
  • Raised Planter Bed From Pallets
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: Enclosed Raised Beds

These Lego-Like Bricks Make Building a Raised Garden Bed a Snap

We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targeted ads, analyze site traffic, and understand where our audiences come from. To learn more or opt-out, read our Cookie Policy. With little more than a few boards, a shovel, and some soil, you can easily create an ideal habitat for growing vegetables in your yard. But gardening in a raised bed offers a number of advantages. Build the sides high enough and you can even garden while sitting.

Raised beds also allow you to start fresh with enriched, uncontaminated soil-; on sloped property, they offer level, easy-to-tend planting areas. And because these beds warm up faster in the spring than those at ground level, you get a head start on the growing season. Seaman, who shares his gardening know-how online at Eartheasy. Here we provide practical advice about the types of frame materials and mulches to use, ways to enhance soil fertility, and the various options for irrigating.

Plus, we offer strategies for deterring insects and other invaders. In short, we show you all you need to know to get started as a raised-bed gardener. Shown: To make optimal use of the space in these raised beds, use tall teepee trellises to provide sturdy supports for pole beans.

Shown: TOH landscape contractor Roger Cook helps a homeowner build a frame out of 2x western red cedar, a naturally rot-resistant wood well suited for this purpose. He advises against using preservative-treated boards or creosote-soaked railroad ties, which can leach chemicals that contaminate soil. Until fairly recently, about the only way to get a raised bed was to buy some boards, cut them to size, and screw them together yourself. Or you could hire a mason to build one for you out of brick or stone.

The only limits were your imagination and budget. But these days, you can find a growing assortment of all-inclusive raised-bed kits with precut parts that save time, eliminate guesswork, and offer a variety of looks. They may not have the one-of-a-kind uniqueness of scratch- or pro-built beds, but they come in a wide array of striking materials—including wood, steel, composite boards, and tumbled concrete blocks—that can add a handsome accent to any landscape.

Shown: These kit-built beds have porous, rot-proof sides made of wood chips and cement. Tender herbs can grow in 6 or 8 inches of soil, but many vegetable roots go much deeper. Make room for them by building a high- sided bed or double-digging below grade or both. As you dig, amend the top 10 inches of under-bed soil with peat moss or coconut coir.

This organic matter helps retain water in sandy soil and improve drainage in clay soils. This bed, made of lightweight corrugated steel, has a colorful powder coating. This type of bed will last nearly forever with minimal maintenance, but requires a concrete footing poured below the frost line and someone with bricklaying skills to build it.

Weep holes every 2 feet or so in the base course let water drain out. Line the bed with landscape fabric so water can drain without carrying away soil. If you want another color, you can apply a heat-reflective paint. These food-grade planks are BPA- and phthalate-free.

Usually a blend of plastic and wood fiber, these boards are more resilient than vinyl, and last longer than wood. Or blend compost with topsoil or bagged garden soil.

Or plant seeds for a thick cover crop of alfalfa, buckwheat, white clover, or annual ryegrass. Do this 30 to 60 days before the first frost so the seeds have time to germinate. Shown: Fill the bed right to the top with soil; it will soon settle a few inches, leaving a lip to hold in the mulch. With prefab connectors, you can quickly build beds with your choice of wood or composite planks. Just slide them into the connector grooves, and screw into place, as needed. Rigid powder-coated aluminum brackets from 8 to 35 inches tall form sturdy corners for a range of bed heights.

Matching in-line extrusions are available to connect side walls. This wood-plastic composite corner has grooves on all sides to join corners and side walls, and even to link up with other beds, no screws required. These ABS plastic brackets pivot degrees, allowing you to build beds in interesting, non-rectangular shapes.

To stack them, simply insert the built-in stake into the bracket below; slot in boards and secure with screws. The right top layer-—about 3 inches thick—discourages weeds, retains moisture, adds nutrients, and keeps the soil where it belongs.

Sprinklers can waste half the water they emit. Stop them from sucking up moisture and nutrients by digging a 2-foot-deep trench around the bed and lining it with corrugated plastic panels. Overlap panel edges by 6 inches and seal them with polyurethane adhesive and stainless sheet-metal screws. A strip of copper flashing wrapped around the outside of beds can keep slugs out. Crispy seaweed mulch or a sprinkling of coffee grounds also repel them. Or patrol beds an hour before sunrise or an hour after dark to pick them off plants by hand.

Add companion plants such as marigolds, nasturtiums, and petunias to vegetable beds to repel these little suckers. These plants emit compounds that discourage all kinds of damaging insects—including whiteflies, cabbage loopers, and squash bugs—from munching away in your garden.

Enclose your vegetable garden with a fence at least 3 feet tall and 3 feet from your beds. Rig the gate to close automatically, and make sure it has no gaps wider than an inch. Plastic netting at least 8 feet high hung around the garden perimeter will keep deer from bounding over. It works because deer can jump high or far, but not both. To protect tender plants from cold snaps in spring and fall, place a cloche, or small tent, over the bed. Be sure to lift the plastic on sunny days, or provide a vent at the peak on each end so heat can escape.

Remove the tent entirely when the danger of frost is past. A grid-style trellis attached to a raised bed provides the support that peas and beans need as they climb toward the sun.

Flat, smooth capstones offer a welcome place to sit when weeding and harvesting in this custom stone bed. Tip: Before building or setting a raised bed in place, make sure—by excavating, if necessary—that it will be resting on level ground. These curved metal planters are made of weathering steel, an alloy that corrodes only on the surface for a warm rusty finish.

The inch-high walls of this U-shaped, western red cedar kit-built bed put plants within easy reach. An add-on fence raises the outside to a deer-discouraging 67 inches tall and doubles as a trellis support.

The solid stain on these custom frames makes a pleasing contrast with the pea-gravel pathways. Just stick the side-board tenons through the mortises in the ends; black locust pegs hold the boards together. You can stack the finished frames as high as you like. Made of white cedar, these boards weather to a soft gray. Cookie banner We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targeted ads, analyze site traffic, and understand where our audiences come from.

By choosing I Accept , you consent to our use of cookies and other tracking technologies. All About Raised Garden Beds. By Thomas Baker. Pinterest Email Pocket Flipboard. Raised-Bed Gardens Raised beds also allow you to start fresh with enriched, uncontaminated soil-; on sloped property, they offer level, easy-to-tend planting areas.

Wood-framed beds and kits are easy to build, even for a beginning DIYer. In most cases, the hardest part is preparing the soil under the bed and filling the frame. Choose a spot that gets at least 8 hours of sun a day, and orient each bed so its long side runs east to west. Keep beds at least 6 feet from pavement and south-facing walls, which intensify summer heat.

Beds built with western red cedar can last 10 to 15 years; galvanized steel, 20 years; masonry or plastic composites, indefinitely. Either drive 2x stakes next to the sides or attach the ends of wood or metal strapping to opposite sides of the bed.

High beds mean less digging and less stooping, but need more soil and building materials. How deep to make it? Hay alfalfa or a grass breaks down faster, enriching the soil; but avoid the fresh stuff used for animal feed—it contains weed seeds. Grinding them up first makes them less likely to mat and helps them break down faster. Put them on paths between beds. Shown: Straw mulch keeps leaves and produce clean and dry. Just lay it in the bed, and hold it in place with landscape staples.

Thread on a pressure regulator set to 15 psi for spray-free operation, and connect it to a hose bib with a backflow preventer. Drip tape: Flat tubing made of polyethylene—a plastic similar to that in milk jugs—comes in various widths, wall thicknesses, and drip-hole spacing. These tapes only go in straight runs; a rigid manifold at one end of the bed feeds water to each tape.

Use a pressure regulator set to 15 psi or less to prevent bursting. Both work best at 25 psi. An add-on sensor suspends the schedule if it rains. Shown: Drip tape irrigates in straight runs. Damage Control: Tree Roots Illustration by Doug Adams How to deal with creeping, crawly, and furry invaders that can decimate a garden. Keep Out Aphids Illustration by Doug Adams Add companion plants such as marigolds, nasturtiums, and petunias to vegetable beds to repel these little suckers.

Extend the Growing Season Photo by Gap Photos To protect tender plants from cold snaps in spring and fall, place a cloche, or small tent, over the bed. Give Peas and Beans a Chance Photo by Mark Turner A grid-style trellis attached to a raised bed provides the support that peas and beans need as they climb toward the sun.

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Raised Garden Beds

So you're thinking of creating a raised bed or planter with reclaimed or new railway sleepers to add something extra to your garden? A special feature, some raised vegetable beds, a beautiful raised border? A big 'thank you' to all of our customers and friends who've sent us digital photos and descriptions of their railway sleeper raised beds, whether in the garden or part of their business, and generously shared their raised bed railway sleeper projects online. It's both inspiring and illuminating for others to see what you've created and hear of your struggles or achievements. It's not necessarily about wanting to copy what you've done - more about being given inspiration or great ideas and endless possibilities.

Steel Raised Garden Beds won't split, rot, rust, or leach. 4 heights to choose from. Create your ideal garden with better drainage + easy maintenance.

Raised Beds vs. In-Ground Gardens

Raised-bed gardening is a form of gardening in which the soil is enclosed in three-to-four-foot-wide 1. The soil is raised above the surrounding soil [1] approximately six inches to waist-high and may be enriched with compost. Vegetable plants are spaced in geometric patterns, much closer together than in conventional row gardening. Raised beds lend themselves to the development of complex agriculture systems that utilize many of the principles and methods of permaculture. They can be used effectively to control erosion and recycle and conserve water and nutrients by building them along contour lines on slopes. This form of gardening is compatible with square foot gardening and companion planting. Circular raised beds with a path to the center a slice of the circle cut out are called keyhole gardens. A self watering raised bed known as a wicking bed is particularly beneficial in dry climates and are often made by converting Intermediate bulk container IBC's. Vegetable garden bed construction materials should be chosen carefully.

28 Best DIY Raised Bed Garden Ideas & Designs

Raised bed gardens are one of the most productive ways to grow your own food. They give you better control over the soil conditions and allow for quick and easy harvesting of your crops. Raised beds can be simple or quite elaborate depending on your needs and the overall aesthetic you wish to create. Use the information below to determine what type of raised beds you would like in your own garden.

Select is editorially independent.

30 Raised Garden Bed Ideas

Whether you have acres of land or a tiny balcony, you can grow beautiful plants! One way to garden that everyone can enjoy— regardless of space—is by using the best raised garden bed planters and containers to add color, interest, and beauty. Container gardening is even a great way to include plants that attract pollinators or add privacy to a patio or deck. You might want grow your flowers and vegetables this way if your soil isn't so great, or if you want to avoid having to bend over while gardening. Protecting your plants in a container will also prevent hungry critters from munching on your seedlings!

40 Unique Container Gardening Ideas

We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targeted ads, analyze site traffic, and understand where our audiences come from. To learn more or opt-out, read our Cookie Policy. With little more than a few boards, a shovel, and some soil, you can easily create an ideal habitat for growing vegetables in your yard. But gardening in a raised bed offers a number of advantages. Build the sides high enough and you can even garden while sitting. Raised beds also allow you to start fresh with enriched, uncontaminated soil-; on sloped property, they offer level, easy-to-tend planting areas. And because these beds warm up faster in the spring than those at ground level, you get a head start on the growing season. Seaman, who shares his gardening know-how online at Eartheasy.

From raised garden beds to flower boxes, and vertical planters, you'll enjoy 4m - image shows 4ft trough planter) these wooden troughs provide growing.

Raised Planter Bed From Pallets

These creative ideas for plant containers come from home gardens. Discover ways to make unique planters with inexpensive and recycled garden pots and some wonderful plants. Want something with wheels or whiskey barrels?

RELATED VIDEO: How to Build a MASSIVE Raised Garden Box - Free Plans!

Creating DIY raised garden beds, or garden boxes, in your backyard is a great way to protect your veggies, herbs, and flowers from pathway weeds, pests, and root rot. Depending upon your space, style, and needs, there is a great design out there for your raised garden beds! I love this U-shaped design from My Daily Randomness that allows for access on all sides. This design fills up an ordinary backyard with ease, and will grow massive amounts of food.

By Jennifer Ebert published 11 AprilOur curated selection of the best raised garden bed ideas will help you to unlock your garden's true potential.

Rethink your porch planting with a container that proves there's elegance and purpose in simplicity. Fragrant rosemary, basil, and lemon grass accent soft blue plumbago in this tabletop setup. The best part? While the scent appeals to garden party guests, it could also help keep pests at arm's length. Start with a young lemon grass plant positioned in the center of the pot.

Raised garden bed ideas offer the solution for many common gardeners' woes, from sore knees to poor soil conditions. They can also make a stunning feature for an outdoor space, adding extra height and interest when filled with beautiful flowers, vegetables, and even shrubs. If you suffer from joint or mobility problems, then raised garden beds can be built at just the right height for you to plant and prune in comfort.



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