How to take care of a ponytail plant


How to take care of a ponytail plant that is dying on me

I’ve talked in a few posts about my love of plants, and the challenges in caring for them. It seems that all of the news articles I read talk about the height of the current winter, and the fact that we’re looking at a “cold” winter. My question is, are all plants being given enough water?

I’ve got a “head” plant that just gives me the middle finger as I pick it up. Seriously, I’m watering it constantly, and I do my best to not kill it. Here s a picture of the head:

I read online that a rough way of figuring out the amount of water a plant needs is to do the math with the size of the leaves, and the size of the root. I have three different types of plants, and not all of them are doing as well as the head, and not all three are the same.

Here s a list of measurements for the three of them:

Daisy:

Dog Rose:

Almond:

It seems like Daisy gets the most water, and it’s doing well. It has tiny leaves, so that seems to indicate the water is going down to the roots. The other two don’t need as much water, they have larger leaves and the leaves are also covering up the roots. So the level of water should be higher. The other two plants have a mix of leaves and buds.

I ve been thinking, though, and wondered if the solution was to open the water tank, and put more water in. A question I ve read was whether adding more water would cause the plant to “top”. I didn t really understand the term, but I thought it meant the plant was growing too much, and it was going to break off.

So I ve been thinking about that a little bit. So what if I put more water in the tank, and see if the head goes up? The leaf structure of the head is kind of unique to this plant, so I could mess it up by adding more water. Since the head is the main part of the plant, I d like to give it the right amount of water so that the other two plants get a nice long growth time.

I ll put that question out there, but maybe I ll just try a few different things. I am so busy, and worried about how many of the plants I m keeping are doing well, and how many are not. I can always find time for a brain cell that s left with time to spare.

So, can I add a couple of tablespoons of water to the tank, and see if it does what I think it will?

So, can I add a couple of tablespoons of water to the tank, and see if it does what I think it will?

The first thing that comes to mind is that you could build a sprayer to pump water up to the tank. Then you just turn on the water and turn on the pump. You could do this at night and wake up to water your plants in the morning.

I used to do that in college and it worked quite well, but I don't know if you've ever sprayed a whole house with something this cold. I got pretty good at standing in front of my radiator and turning it on and off. :)

I would just build a sprayer of sorts that directs the flow of water to the tank. Do this for a few days and see what happens.

I ve got a head plant that gives me the middle finger as I pick it up. Seriously, I m watering it constantly, and I do my best to not kill it.

That's a sign of healthy growth.

Sounds like you've been watering enough to keep it going.

You could try watering every other day instead of the usual continuous drip. (At minimum that is.)

If the tank doesn't get too low, and the head stays up, then you have the perfect opportunity to see if it responds to a longer water supply.

Otherwise, you'll probably need to add to the tank with more water.

I ve been thinking, though, and wondered if the solution was to open the water tank, and put more water in. A question I ve read was whether adding more water would cause the plant to "top"

Yes, that can happen. But plants need the water to circulate around the roots and leaves, and the water that's running off the leaves usually drains into the potting soil or other potting medium. Not all plants are alike, and they all have their needs for humidity and light. If the head is thriving, then there are probably more benefits to be had.

I ve been thinking, though, and


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