Mammillaria duwei


Scientific Name

Mammillaria duwei Rogoz. & P.J.Braun

Synonyms

Mammillaria crinita subsp. duwei, Mammillaria nana subsp. duwei, Mammillaria trichacantha subsp. duwei

Scientific Classification

Family: Cactaceae
Subfamily: Cactoideae
Tribe: Cacteae
Subtribe: Cactinae
Genus: Mammillaria

Description

Mammillaria duwei is a small, solitary, rarely offsetting cactus with stem up to 1.6 inches (4 cm) tall and up to 2.4 inches (6 cm) in diameter. The stem is dark green, with 28 to 36 radial spines. They are thin, white, brownish at base, interlacing and densely wrapped against the body. The central spine is yellowish, hooked, and is not present on all clones. The flowers are funnel-shaped, yellowish-cream to light yellow and up 0.8 inches (2 cm) in diameter.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 9b to 11b: from 25 °F (−3.9 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

To encourage better flowering, allow the plants to enjoy a cooling period in the winter and suspend watering. Unlike many other cacti, which use their ribs as storage devices, Mammillaria feature raised tubercles, from which spines emerge. When you water, the tubercles will expand to allow for increased water storage. The flowers emerge from the axils of these tubercles on the previous year's growth, which accounts for their interesting halo effect. It's imperative that the cactus is not exposed to prolonged dampness and sitting water. Never let your cactus sit in a dish of water. Lastly, make sure to fertilize during the growing season for the best results.

Repot as needed, preferably during the warm season. To repot Mammillaria, make sure the soil is dry before repotting, then gently remove the pot. Knock away the old soil from the roots, making sure to remove any rotted or dead roots in the process. Treat any cuts with a fungicide. Place the plant in its new pot and backfill with potting soil, spreading the roots out as you repot. Leave the plant dry for a week or so, then begin to water lightly to reduce the risk of root rot… – See more at: How to Grow and Care for Mammillaria

Origin

Mammillaria duwei is endemic to Mexico, where it occurs only in the state of Guanajuato.

Links

  • Back to genus Mammillaria
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Mammillaria

Family: Cactaceae (kak-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Mammillaria (mam-mil-AR-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: crinita subsp. duweii
Synonym:Mammillaria duweii
Synonym:Mammillaria nana subsp. duwei
Synonym:Mammillaria duwei
Synonym:Mammillaria duwei var. longispina

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs Water regularly do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

From seed direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen clean and dry seeds

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Gardeners' Notes:

On Apr 28, 2005, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

small, neat offsetting globoid cactus with small, nearly harmless spines (wrapped against body of cactus), though fairly variable, with some plants having very nasty, hooked spines. Delicate cactus with a tendency to rot if the body of the plant gets wet, particularly if very hot or cold out.


Mammillaria duwei - garden

Scientific name: Mammillaria duweiRogozinski & Braun
In: Kakt. and. Sukk. 36(8): 158-164 1985

Origin: Garden origin (Nursery produced cultivar) Mexico (Guanajuato and Queretaro)

Conservation status: Listed in CITES appendix 2.

Description: Small solitary rarely offsetting plants that eventually forms tiny mounds.
Stems: Heads 3,5 to 6 cm in diameter, 2 - 4 cm high, dark green, soft, globoid, flattened-globose , to shortly cylindrical. .
Tubercles: S mall, clavate 4-5 mm high, With a woolly axil and little hair.
Central spines: 0 - 1 or 2 (occasiaonally 4). The long central spine is not present on all the clones, yellowish, hooked, to 8 mm long, pubescent.
Radial spines: 28 - 36, acicular, thin, white, brownish at base, pubescent, 3.5 - 4 mm long , interlacing and densely wrapped against the body of the cactus
Flowers: Funnel-form, less deeply set, yellowish/cream to l ight yellow, about 20 mm long and in diameter. Inner segments lanceolate, widely spreading, accuminate, style and stigma lobes greenish.
Blooming season: Flowers readily, and for a long period from spring to the early summer ..
Fruit: Light red to red , elongated .
Seed: Blackish brown.


The little yellow flowers appear in a ring through the crown of the plant in springtime.

Photo of conspecific taxa, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Mammillaria crinita complex (This taxon has lots of synonyms (like most mammillaria ) with several controversial varieties and subspecies) :


Mammillaria duwei - garden

Accepted Scientific Name: Mammillaria crinita subs. duwei (Rogoz. & P.J.Braun)
[Basionym: Mammillaria duwei Rogoz. & P.J.Braun 1985]

Origin and Habitat: This species is found at one location northeast of the city of Guanajuato, Mexico (extent of occurrence and area of occupancy 35 km2).
Altitude range: 1.800 - 2.000 metres above sea level.
Habitat: This species is found on volcanic rock in xerophyllous scrub. Mammillaria duwei is known from only one location, has a small population size, and there is a continuing decline due to overcollection and development. The southernmost of the two known subpopulations of this species has declined as a result of collecting over the past 15 years. Currently the total population is estimated at approximately 500 individuals.

  • Mammillaria crinita subs. duwei (Rogoz. & P.J.Braun)
    • Mammillaria duwei Rogoz. & P.J.Braun
    • Mammillaria nana subs. duwei (Rogoz. & P.J.Braun) Pilbeam
    • Mammillaria trichacantha subs. duwei (Rogoz. & P.J.Braun) Mottram

Description: Mammillaria duwei is a small solitary rarely offsetting plants that eventually forms tiny mounds.
Taxonomic Notes: Mammillaria duwei is considered a synonym of Mammillaria crinita by Anderson (2001) and by Fitz Maurice (2002). Considered a provisional species by Hunt (1999) and a subspecies of Mammillaria nana by Pilbeam (1999).
Stems: Heads 3,5 to 6 cm in diameter, 2-4 cm high, dark green, soft, globoid, flattened-globose, to shortly cylindrical.
Tubercles: Small, clavate 4-5 mm high, With a woolly axil and little hair.
Central spines: 0-1 or 2 (occasiaonally 4). The long central spine is not present on all the clones, yellowish, hooked, to 8 mm long, pubescent.
Radial spines: 28-36, acicular, thin, white, brownish at base, pubescent, 3,5-4 mm long, interlacing and densely wrapped against the body of the cactus.
Flowers: Funnel-form, less deeply set, yellowish/cream to light yellow, about 20 mm long and in diameter. Inner segments lanceolate, widely spreading, accuminate, style and stigma lobes greenish.
Blooming season: Flowers readily, and for a long period from spring to the early summer.
Fruits: Light red to red, elongated.
Seeds: Blackish brown.

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Mammillaria crinita complex

  • Mammillaria aurihamata" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/8849/Mammillaria_aurihamata'> Mammillaria aurihamata Boed. : has golden yellow hooked central spines. Distribution: Mexico, where it occurs in San Luis Potosi, near Real de Catorce.
  • Mammillaria brevicrinita" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/8894/Mammillaria_brevicrinita'> Mammillaria brevicrinita Repp. : (Mammillaria crinita) Radial spines 10 - 29, white, finely pubescent, 6 - 9 mm long.
    Central spines: 0 - 7, awl-shaped, yellowish to red to dark brown, 8-16 mm long, one or two hooked.
  • Mammillaria crinita DC. : This taxon comprises a very variable a complex of forms, variety and species with varible spination. The flowers cream colored to a pink-cream colored. This is one of the most prolific bloomers among the Mammillarias.
  • Mammillaria crinita subs. duwei" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/11148/Mammillaria_crinita_subs._duwei'> Mammillaria crinita subs. duwei (Rogoz. & P.J.Braun) : It is a small cactus with delicate near harmless feathery spines densely wrapped against the body of the cactus. The long central spine is not present on all the clones, they are yellowish, hooked, to 8 mm long, pubescent. The flowers are yellowish/cream to light yellow.
  • Mammillaria crinita subs. duwei f. cristata" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/20886/Mammillaria_crinita_subs._duwei_f._cristata'> Mammillaria crinita subs. duwei f. cristata hort. : crested form completely covered by tight pubescent spines.
  • Mammillaria crinita subs. duwei f. inermis" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/25083/Mammillaria_crinita_subs._duwei_f._inermis'> Mammillaria crinita subs. duwei f. inermis hort. : this is a selected strain with pure feathery radial spines (central spines absent)
  • Mammillaria crinita subs. duwei f. monstruosa" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/11153/Mammillaria_crinita_subs._duwei_f._monstruosa'> Mammillaria crinita subs. duwei f. monstruosa hort. : This is a true oddity and some say that this monster is nothing else than a abnormal root grafted upside down.
  • Mammillaria crinita f. nana (Backeb.)
  • Mammillaria crinita subs. painteri (Rose) U.Guzmán : has red, brown or coffee coloured central spines. With age it may offset from the base to form a small cluster. Distribution: Queretaro and adjacent areas in Hidalgo and Guanajuato.
  • Mammillaria crinita subs. painteri f. monstruosa cristata" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/15654/Mammillaria_crinita_subs._painteri_f._monstruosa_cristata'> Mammillaria crinita subs. painteri f. monstruosa cristata hort. : Crested form. has more bristly spines than the Mammillaria crinita subs. painteri f. monstruosa from which it derives.
  • Mammillaria crinita subs. painteri f. monstruosa" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/11150/Mammillaria_crinita_subs._painteri_f._monstruosa'> Mammillaria crinita subs. painteri f. monstruosa hort. : Cultivated mutant characterized by very reduced or absent spines, free branching, and with small pink flowers.
  • Mammillaria glochidiata var. xiloensis" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/11149/Mammillaria_glochidiata_var._xiloensis'> Mammillaria glochidiata var. xiloensis Repp. : (Mammillaria crinita)Plants irregularly forming tightly packed cluster of egg-shaped balls, up to 5 cm tall with dark yellow fine hooklike spines and pale cream-pink flowers.
  • Mammillaria monancistracantha Backeb. : (Mammillaria crinita f. nana)
  • Mammillaria scheinvariana" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/8869/Mammillaria_scheinvariana'> Mammillaria scheinvariana R.Ortega V. & Glass : (Mammillaria crinita)Stem covered by numerous hairlike radial spines, giving the plant a shaggy appearance.
  • Mammillaria tezontle" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/8879/Mammillaria_tezontle'> Mammillaria tezontle W.A.Fitz Maur. & B.Fitz Maur. : has small stems only 1-2 cm in diameter with short, yellow central spination and relatively large flowers. Distribution: North of San Luis Potosi.
  • Mammillaria trichacantha" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/8922/Mammillaria_trichacantha'> Mammillaria trichacantha K.Schum. : (Mammillaria crinita f. nana) It his is a remarkable species on account of its having short hooked brown to yellow/orangish spines that finally turn to gray.
  • Mammillaria wildii A.Dietr. : (Mammillaria crinita ssp. wildii) Short brownish to yellow hooked, minutely pubescent central spines and 1 to 15, whitish, smooth, 4 to 5 mm long radials.
  • Mammillaria wildii f. cristata" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/11152/Mammillaria_wildii_f._cristata'> Mammillaria wildii f. cristata hort. : (Mammillaria crinita ssp wildii "cristata") It will form huge crested and free flowering mounds up 40 cm (or more) in diameter.
  • Mammillaria zeilmanniana" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/8915/Mammillaria_zeilmanniana'> Mammillaria zeilmanniana Boed. : has flowers typically carmine violet to purple-pink in color, seldom white. Distribution: San Miguel de Allende in Cañada Virgen, Guanajuato.
  • Mammillaria zeilmanniana f. albiflora" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/29283/Mammillaria_zeilmanniana_f._albiflora'> Mammillaria zeilmanniana f. albiflora hort. : is a white flowered sport that was produced in cultivation and not known to occur in the wild.

Notes: This plant is a member of the Mammillaria crinita complex (Stylothele Series). Only some authors consider Mammillaria duwei to be a good species the others classify it as M. crinita (e.g. According to Anderson's classification, this species is considered as a synonym of Mammillaria crinita)

Bibliography: Major references and further lectures
1) David Hunt, Nigel Taylor “The New Cactus Lexicon” DH Books, 2006
2) Edward F. Anderson “The Cactus Family” Timber Press, 2001
3) Rod Preston-Mafham, Ken Preston-Mafham "Cacti: the illustrated dictionary" Timber Press, 1991
4) John Pilbeam (1999) "Mammillaria The Cactus File Handbook" - page 203.
5) Fitz Maurice, B & Fitz Maurice, W.A. 2013. Mammillaria duwei. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. . Downloaded on 31 May 2015.


Mammillaria duwei (Mammillaria crinita subs. duwei) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Mammillaria duwei (Mammillaria crinita subs. duwei) Photo by: Zoltán Oláh
Mammillaria duwei (Mammillaria crinita subs. duwei) Photo by: Frikkie Hall
Mammillaria duwei (Mammillaria crinita subs. duwei) Photo by: Frikkie Hall

Watch the video: Mammillaria in Mexico


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