Echinocactus texensis


Succulentopedia

Echinocactus texensis (Horse Crippler)

Echinocactus texensis (Horse Crippler) is a stout barrel cactus, solitary when young and very rarely slowly clustering in age. The stem is…


Echinocactus texensis

This is one the only Echinocactus I have found to be hardy for me so far. Echinocactus texensis is found in west TX, and south eastern NM.Echinocactus texensis, grows as a stout, ribbed, barrel cactus,2-8 inches tall and can get 12 inches in diameter(8 inches in diameter is more common.) It is protected by heavy claw shaped spines. Flowers are are pale-pink to off-white, with red centers, and feathery edges. I have read that they can be orange but have never seen that variation. Hardy to 0 Fahrenheit.

I grow one or two Echinocacti in pots, one of them is very similar to yours but I think it has yellow flowers?

Once I had several cacti species but I have lost some during the winters although I grow them in pots and move them to a frost free site during the winter. Last winter however, I lost 5-6 species in my "frost free" room during the very harsh winter here. This winter has been ever worse, the mean temperature of November was 5C/9F colder than normal and December has started out very cold too.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

HoyIf you have a picture of the Echinocacti in bloom I will try to identify it. No guarantees on my part but I do have a forum I post on, "CactiGuide.com" that does a very good of identification.

From the High Desert Steppe of the Great Basin and the Eastern Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range Located in Reno/Sparks,NV zone 6-7 http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/ John P Weiser

I like the feathery edges of the beautiful flowers, a most desirable cactus. :)

Mark McDonough Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5 antennaria at aol.com

HoyIf you have a picture of the Echinocacti in bloom I will try to identify it. No guarantees on my part but I do have a forum I post on, "CactiGuide.com" that does a very good of identification.

Sorry, only old slides as I haven't pictured houseplants recently! Have to wait till next summer.

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Horse cripplers are among my favorite cacti: unfortunately, idiotic ranchers across Texas and New Mexico uproot and destroy them mercilessly because of that stupid common name (poor bastards don't want their horses crippled). I doubt that many horses are dumb enough to step on these. My ex wife once owned a wonderful ranch near Sweetwater Texas with a mesa boasting hundreds of these. The land was rented and the renters went through and destroyed every Echinocactus they could find. Gwen was so sick at their stupidity she sold the land. A friend knows a rancher who wants to get rid of them and he has been transplanting them to Pueblo where he has an amazing collection: at this extreme end of their range their flower color can be nearly red, orange and often multicolored. In Colorado they require extremely good drainage and a very warm, special microclimate to persist: we have had this lovely pink one on our Dryland Mesa for many years. A few local cactus growers are growing them, but not nearly enough! I have seen specimens a foot across! And they bloom for a very long time. John! You have struck a nerve..

Notice in the overall shot of Dryland Mesa, the horse crippler is in the lower lefthand margin to give you perspective: our winter was so consistent last year with lots of snow that bulbs and dryland plants really reveled when it finally warmed up. Three fabulous springs in a row. but now La Nina bodes drier winters. back to the drawingboard!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Horse cripplers are among my favorite cacti: unfortunately, idiotic ranchers across Texas and New Mexico uproot and destroy them mercilessly because of that stupid common name (poor bastards don't want their horses crippled). I doubt that many horses are dumb enough to step on these. My ex wife once owned a wonderful ranch near Sweetwater Texas with a mesa boasting hundreds of these. The land was rented and the renters went through and destroyed every Echinocactus they could find. Gwen was so sick at their stupidity she sold the land. A friend knows a rancher who wants to get rid of them and he has been transplanting them to Pueblo where he has an amazing collection: at this extreme end of their range their flower color can be nearly red, orange and often multicolored. In Colorado they require extremely good drainage and a very warm, special microclimate to persist: we have had this lovely pink one on our Dryland Mesa for many years. A few local cactus growers are growing them, but not nearly enough! I have seen specimens a foot across! And they bloom for a very long time. John! You have struck a nerve..

Notice in the overall shot of Dryland Mesa, the horse crippler is in the lower lefthand margin to give you perspective: our winter was so consistent last year with lots of snow that bulbs and dryland plants really reveled when it finally warmed up. Three fabulous springs in a row. but now La Nina bodes drier winters. back to the drawingboard!

You find stupid people everywhere! I got sick too!You have La Nina, we have the NAO!

Trond Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Nice plants, I'd love to see the orange and reds too!Re: ranchers, its a pet peeve of mine that there are some native wildflowers here which are on official weed lists!! simply because they are poisonous to livestock! even if one needed to limit them within a pasture, there is no need to try to eliminate them on land not used for grazing.


Horse Crippler (Echinocactus texensis) – Cactus Plants

Horse Crippler (Echinocactus texensis) is an attractive, stout barrel cactus, which solitary when young and very rarely slowly clustering in age. The stem is pale grey-green to grass green with numerous ribs, above-ground portion, flat-topped, hemispheric in old age but usually deep-seated, flush with soil surface 30 cm in diameter, 20 cm tall. The spines are small but strong, pale tan, pink or reddish to grey. The flowers are range from white through rose-pink to pale silvery-pink, with red throats in late spring and can appear on plants around 10cm in diameter. The Fruits are scarlet or crimson, spheric to ovoid, fleshy, up to 5 cm long and up to 4 cm in diameter.

Scientific Classification:

Subfamily: Cactoideae
Tribe: Cacteae
Genus: Echinocactus

Scientific Name: Echinocactus texensis Hopffer
Synonyms: Echinocactus courantianus, Echinocactus lindheimeri, Echinocactus platycephalus, Homalocephala texensis.
Common Names: Horse Crippler, Devil’s Pincushion, Horse Crippler Cactus, Devil’s Head, Candy Cactus.

How to grow and maintain Horse Crippler (Echinocactus texensis):

Light:
It grows well in full sun. Echinocactus do best in a very sunny window, perhaps a southern exposure. Cactus plants that do not get enough sunlight will grow more slowly and fail to thrive.

Soil:
It prefers any rich, well-drained soil such us clay, pumice, lava grit, and if you use a regular peat-based mix, be sure to add sand or extra perlite to enhance drainage and repot the plant when the soil begins to break down. Or use a cactus soil mix. is ideal.

Temperature:
Echinocactus prefers average temperatures between 50 degrees Fahrenheit – 75 degrees Fahrenheit / 10 degrees Celsius – 24 degrees Celsius is ideal but not below 40 degrees Fahrenheit / 5 degrees Celsius and avoid frost.

Water:
Water moderately, during the growing season. Allow the top 1 inch of soil to dry out before watering again. During the winter season, do not water the plants but just keep them moist otherwise they will rot.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize your Echinocactus plant once a month, during the growing season, with a weak liquid cactus fertilizer.

Propagation:
Echinocactus can be propagated by seed. To seed a cactus, plant the seeds shallowly in a cactus mix and keep them warm and very slightly moist.

Repotting:
It is best to re-pot at the start of the developing season, or summer. To re-pot cacti, ensure the soil is dry before repotting, then gently expel the pot. Knock away the old soil from the roots, making sure to remove any rotted or dead roots in the process. Treat any cuts with a fungicide. Place the plant in its new pot and backfill with potting soil, spreading the roots out as you re-pot. Leave the plant dry for a week or so, then begin to water lightly to reduce the risk of root rot.

Pests and Diseases:
It has no serious pest and diseases problems. Watch for infestations of mealybug, scale insects, and spider mite. Expel mealybugs by dipping cotton swabs in rubbing alcohol and dabbing them or spray the cactus thoroughly with insecticidal soap once a week until they’re gone.


Watch the video: Coltivare cactus: Echinocactus horizonthalonius


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